New Laptop Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon 2015 specs Review

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The Lenovo’s goal with the X1 Carbon has always been simple: to make the ultimate 14-inch business ultraportable. But the last couple of editions have produced mixed results. The 2013 touch-screen version didn’t last long enough on a charge, and the keyboard on last year’s model didn’t live up to the ThinkPad pedigree. With the third generation of the X1 Carbon (starting at $1,079; $1,754 as tested), Lenovo has made several enhancements, delivering a long-lasting, comfortable and durable workhorse that road warriors will want to own.
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As svelte, sturdy and classically handsome as ever, the X1 Carbon is an all-black ultraportable with a bottom made of magnesium and aluminum. The display cover uses carbon-fiber and glass-fiber reinforced plastic, and the hinges are reinforced with carbon fiber. The design isn’t flashy, but it’s tough and does a good job of resisting fingerprints. The gently pulsating red dot above the “i” in the ThinkPad logo and the red TrackPoint add small dashes of color. Why so much carbon fiber? Lenovo says it’s as strong as aluminum but a third of the weight. Lenovo also claims that the Carbon passes eight MIL-Spec tests (MIL-STD 810G) for everything from low and high temperatures to humidity, sand and shock.
This is in addition to Lenovo’s own drop, flex and spill tests. For instance, Lenovo spills 500 cc (or close to 17 ounces) of water on the X1 Carbon. The X1 Carbon is among the lightest 14-inch laptops we’ve tested. It weighs just 3.07 pounds, compared to the aluminum-clad EliteBook Folio 1040’s 3.4 pounds. The newer, 12.5-inch EliteBook Folio 1020 is 2.7 pounds. The Dell XPS 13 2015, which has a touch-screen display, weighs 2.8 pounds. Measuring 13 x 8.9 x 0.73 inches, the Lenovo is a little thicker than the EliteBook 1040 (0.63 inches) and the XPS 13 (0.68 inches).
the Lenovo has made two big changes to the X1 versus the previous edition: It ditched the innovative but confusing Adaptive Function Row for a more traditional Function row and added dedicated mouse buttons for the TrackPoint. I’m happy to say that both changes add up to a much better ergonomic experience. Gone are the capacitive Function keys above the QWERTY layout, which lit up with different symbols depending on the app you were using. Now, there are more traditional shortcut keys for things such as volume, brightness, settings, task switching (very handy) and displaying all of your apps. The result is something that’s less ambitious but more practical. I’m glad to see that Lenovo enlarged the Backspace key on this X1 Carbon, too. Based on our measurements, the X1 Carbon’s backlit keyboard delivers 1.86 mm of travel, paired with an actuation force of 58 grams. Both of these numbers compare favorably to the HP EliteBook Folio 1020 (1.65 mm, 60 grams) and the Dell XPS 13 (1.2 mm, 60 grams). More travel usually means a more desktoplike feel.
 Source : Laptopmag

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New Laptop Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon 2015 specs Review
Aneka Laptop Dan Driver Laptop

New Laptop Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon 2015 specs Review | admin | 4.5